Anne Frank Halloween costume pulled after social media uproar

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Other websites followed suit.

An online retailer has pulled a costume from its website that depicted Holocaust victim Anne Frank.

Frank died of typhus in 1945 at age 15 at a concentration camp in Germany. And indeed, that same costume, made by Smiffy's, is listed on Candy Apple Costumes as "Child's World War II Girl Costume".

As Halloween approaches, people often find and call out really questionable costume ideas.

ADL's St. Louis branch added, "We learn from Anne Frank's life and death to honor her & prevent future atrocity".

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"Now, your child can play the role of a World War II hero with this girls' World War II costume", said the website's description of the costume, which included a blue button-up dress with a felt "destination tag", a beret, and a brown felt shoulder bag.

Carlos Galindo-Elvira, who leads the ADL Arizona office, said on Twitter that the costume trivializes Frank's memory.

Ross Smith, a public relations specialist with Fun.com, which owns HalloweenCostumes.com, issued a statement on Twitter apologizing for the costume and saying the company sells costumes "not only for Halloween, but for many uses outside of the Halloween season, such as school projects and plays".

As of early Monday afternoon. other online retailers, including Walmart still had the costume online, but by a different name. Thankfully, these websites seem to have since removed the items from their listings. "We are pleased that the costume has been pulled".

"There are more appropriate ways to commemorate the legacy of Anne Frank than through a Halloween costume, which is offensive and trivialises her suffering and the suffering of millions during the Holocaust", said Alexandra Devitt, a spokeswoman for the Anne Frank Centre for Mutual Respect. "We take feedback from customers very seriously".

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